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Sea Breeze Guest house is situated in a tropical green garden where you can relax and enjoy the natural environment. The beautiful and famous beach of Unawatuna is only a 2 minutes walk away and the crystal clear water invites you for swimming, diving, snorkeling.

We are offering 5 Deluxe rooms and 8 standerd rooms and all our rooms have mini fridge, ensuite bathrooms with hot and cold water and a terrace or a balcony to the garden. The all rooms are air conditioned.

Relax with an ayurvedic treatment in our massage center or enjoy the Sri Lankan cuisine. We offer traditional home-made food like rice & curry or fish or seafood meals in our little restaurant if requested.

The main road as well as the shopping facilities and restaurants and bars of Unawatuna village are within walking distance, only 3 or 4 minutes away from Sea Breeze. The next bigger town is the city of "Galle" which is famous for its fort (which is a world heritage site) with an old town and there are many more things to explore. Galle is only 5 kilometers away from Unawatuna.


  1. Airport drop off and pick up - USD80 )
  2. Travel and Tours
  3. 24 x 7 Free Internet - Wi Fi
  4. Bicycle Rent
  5. Laundry Service
  6. Excursons & Round Trips
  7. Restaurant Service
  8. Kiosk


Galle Fort, in the Bay of Galle on the southwest coast of Sri Lanka, was built first in 1588 by the Portuguese, then extensively fortified by the Dutch during the 17th century from 1649 onwards. It is a historical, archaeological and architectural heritage monument, which even after more than 423 years maintains a polished appearance, due to extensive reconstruction work done by Archaeological Department of Sri Lanka.

The fort has a colourful history, and today has a multi-ethnic and multi-religious population. The Sri Lankan government and many Dutch people who still own some of the properties inside the fort are looking at making this one of the modern wonders of the world. The heritage value of the fort has been recognized by the UNESCO and the site has been inscribed as a cultural heritage UNESCO World Heritage Site under criteria iv, for its unique exposition of "an urban ensemble which illustrates the interaction of European architecture and South Asian traditions from the 16th to the 19th centuries."

The Galle Fort, also known as the Dutch Fort or the "Ramparts of Galle", withstood the Boxing Day tsunami which damaged part of coastal area Galle town. It has been since restored.

This is no ordinary fishing, there might be several methods of catching a fish but this one is mind-boggling. Fishermen in Sri Lanka use stilts to catch a fish. Stilt Fishing is an old tradition practiced by around 500 fishing families in Galle, in southwestern-most Sri Lanka, especially around the towns of Koggala,Kathaluwa, and Ahangama.

They usually fish during sunset, noon and sunrise, with each one taking their elevated position and balancing about 2 meters above the water. As you can see in the picture front slider, there is a vertical pole engrafted into the sea bed, attached to it is a cross bar, called petta, on which the fishermen do the balancing act. So with one hand they hold the stilt and the other hand they have a fishing rod or a line to catch spotted herrings and small mackerels, which are then kept in a plastic bag tied around their waist or the pole.

So the fishermen of that area don't mind sitting for long hours to get their catch, it seems they don't use a bait either on the hook. Since how long this custom is practiced is not known, Government document which says that according to old fishermen stilt fishing started after the Second World War.

It had disappeared after the 2004 tsunami that struck Sri Lanka and other countries bordering the Indian Ocean, but resumed after things got back to normal. It's a beautiful sight looking at fishermen balancing on a thin plank, but at the same time it's tough too. All this effort and toiling only to preserve their old custom, wonderful!

Plenty of offshore wreck and reef diving, most popular from Unawatuna beach which is just 10 minutes away from Our Guest House. There are a number of dive sites just 10-15 minutes boat trip from Unawatuna as well as companies that will offer non season diving in the North east of Sri Lanka around Trincomalee. If you would like to book trips or lessons, please get in touch and we can assist or make recommendations.

A surfing hotspot in Sri Lanka, Mirissa beach offers waves for nice turns. Morning period is the best. The beach is clean and clear and a great start off point for a run into the waters. The blue waters offer a good ride for beginners and experienced surfers. Mirissa beach is an unpopulated beach.

Mirissa is a pointbreak location with intermediate level waves. Local surfers can be considered to be average to good. Best waves can be experienced early morning and late afternoon. Directions are right hand, and short length.

Yala National Park is the most visited and second largest national park in Sri Lanka. The park consists of five blocks, two of which are now open to the public, and also adjoining parks. The blocks have individual names such as, Ruhuna National Park (block 1) and Kumana National Park or 'Yala East' for the adjoining area. It is situated in the southeast region of the country, and lies in Southern Province and Uva Province. The park covers 979 square kilometres (378 sq mi) and is located about 300 kilometres (190 mi) from Colombo. Yala was designated as a wildlife sanctuary in 1900, and, along with Wilpattu was one of the first two national parks in Sri Lanka, having been designated in 1938. The park is best known for its variety of wild animals. It is important for the conservation of Sri Lankan elephants, Sri Lankan leopards and aquatic birds.

There are six national parks and three wildlife sanctuaries in the vicinity of Yala. Among the largest is Lunugamvehera National Park. The park is situated in the dry semi-arid climatic region and rain is received mainly during the northeast monsoon. Yala hosts a variety of ecosystems ranging from moist monsoon forests to freshwater and marine wetlands. It is one of the 70 Important Bird Areas (IBAs) in Sri Lanka. Yala harbours 215 bird species including six endemic species of Sri Lanka. The number of mammals that has been recorded from the park is 44, and it has one of the highest leopard densities in the world.

The area around Yala has hosted several ancient civilisations. Two important pilgrim sites, Sithulpahuwa and Magul Vihara, are situated within the park. The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami caused severe damage on the Yala National Park and 250 people died in its vicinity. The number of visitors has been on the rise since 2009 after the security situation in the park improved.

Yet another place to be toured regarding Sri Lankan tourism sites is Rumassala. In colonial era it was known as ‘Buona Vista’ (pleasant view). The legendary chronicle ‘Ramayana’ proclaims that ‘Rumassala’ is a chunk of Himalayan Mountains in India. Rumassala hill gives you a beautiful view of the southern coast of galle.

Colonials used Rumassala as a watering point to fill their crafts with fresh water. Even today we can see the Surplus of the jetty. Now it has become a service centre of ships and crafts. The Rumassala forest has a vast collection of bio diversity. It is yet another home to mammals, birds, insects and reptiles. Some of the indigenous and endemic animals, plants had been survived in the jungle.

The ocean is is quite rich with coral reefs and sea bio diversity. Tourists can snorkel, dive and explore the underwater bio diversity. However the Rumassala mountain range and the coral reefs have been ensured.Rumassala is a best place to spend and enjoy your weekends leisurely.

A moonstone is grey in colour and feels cool and smooth to the touch. When polished it has a glow like of the moon. Have you ever wondered where that pretty little moonstone on your finger actually comes from?

Moonstone’s are in the semi-precious category and are an important component of the Sri Lankan gem industry. The finest are bluish in colour and are found in high concentrations in heading inland 7km to Mitiyagoda, between Ambalangoda and Hikkaduwa.

Moonstone has been mined in these sweltering forests forever and the moonstone mines, little more than muddy rabbit holes, 6m or 7m long, are fascinating as is the process of filtering out the precious stones, cutting them up and polishing them up ready for sale. At the Moonstone Factory you can see or even go down into a narrow shaft where the stones are mined.

Whale and Dolphin watching is an easy sport that you can take up during the months of December to April. All you need to take is a boat, few kilometers from the shore, which we can help you arrange. Experienced local guides can show you a good time in watching whales and dolphins off the coast of Mirissa.

Pods of Dolphins can be seen accompanying boats frequently during the said months. Blue and Sperm Whales in large numbers frequent the coastline of Sri Lanka during this period and can be viewed near Mirissa beach, and just close proximity to the hotel.

Kanneliya-Dediyagala-Nakiyadeniya or KDN is a forest complex in southern Sri Lanka. The forest complex designated as a biosphere reserve in 2004 by UNESCO. The KDN complex is the last large remaining rainforest in Sri Lanka other than Sinharaja. This forest area has been identified as one of the floristically richest areas in South Asia.

The forest complex is situated 35 km northwest of city of Galle. The rain forest is a major catchment area for two of the most important rivers in southern Sri Lanka, the Gin and Nilwala Rivers. This biosphere reserve harbors many plants and animal species endemic to Sri Lanka.